Depression in Teens: What Parents and Teens Need to Know

teen depression help

Depression is a serious issue that many teens face. It can be difficult for parents to know how to best support their children during this time. In this blog post, we will discuss the signs of depression in teens and what parents and teens need to know to get help.

If you are a parent of a teen, it is vital to be aware of the signs of depression. These can include changes in mood, sleep, appetite, energy levels, and concentration. If you notice any of these changes in your child, it is important to talk to them about what is going on. It is also important to seek professional help if the changes are severe or if they last for more than a couple of weeks.

As a teen, it is also essential to be aware of the signs of depression. If you are experiencing any of the above changes, it is essential to reach out for help. This can be difficult to do, but many resources available can provide support. You are not alone in this.

What do you say to a depressed teenager? 

Offer compassion and validation instead:
  1. “I can see how you feel overwhelmed by those thoughts.”
  2. “That sounds painful, but you’re not alone. I’m here to support you.”
  3. “I imagine feeling sad all the time must make you feel exhausted. You’re going through so much.”
 

Explain the behaviors worrying you: 

  • “I wonder why you haven’t spent much time with your friends lately.”
  • “I’m worried because you’re sleeping much more than usual.”
  • “I’ve noticed you get angry so quickly these days.”
  • “I’m concerned because you haven’t put much effort into your schoolwork lately.”
 

Then, follow up with open-ended questions:

  • “What happened to change your mind about your friends?”
  • “Can you explain what’s bothering you?”
  • “What’s making you feel this way?”
  • “Do you think about death or dying?” 
 
When they start to open up, use active listening to help them feel heard. Wrap up what you’re doing — work, meal planning, or getting other kids ready for bed — as soon as you can and try not to let the moment pass.
 
Depression sometimes makes people feel as if they’re burdening loved ones. They might take a completely reasonable “Just 5 minutes!” as a rejection and hesitate to “bother” you again.
 
Encouraging your teen to stay active and involved in household responsibilities can help them continue to feel supported. Still, understand there may be times when they don’t feel up to doing much.
 
Remember, depression is an illness. You’d give them a break from household chores and schoolwork if they had the flu, right? Depression can still drain their energy and prevent them from putting in their usual effort.
 

They might:

  • find it harder than usual to concentrate
  • move more slowly than usual
  • seem frustrated and overly self-critical when they make a mistake
 
 Please encourage them to do what they can and offer gentle reminders instead of criticizing forgetfulness.
 

Make some changes as a family

Lifestyle changes can have a lot of benefits for depression symptoms. These changes might include:
  • more physical activity
  • regular nutritious meals
  • plenty of sunshine
  • dedicated bedtimes
  • a nightly wind-down routine
 
Incorporating these changes into your family routine can improve the well-being of everyone without singling them out. As a bonus, new habits can increase family time, helping your teen feel more connected and supported.
 
If you or someone you know is struggling with depression, don’t hesitate to reach out for help. Ketamine SLC offers a wide range of treatments for teens, and we would be happy to discuss your options with you. We also have a wealth of information about depression on our website, including what you can say to the depressed person in your life.
 
We all must work together to support those suffering from this debilitating disease. Please get in touch with us today if you need assistance finding appropriate treatment for yourself or a loved one.